Contact

Email: hello@hant.co.uk

Committee Members

Tor Justad, Chairperson

Tor believes that all waste produced at Dounreay should be retained under constant monitoring and security which would create and maintain employment in Caithness.

He sees his role in HANT as campaigning for greater openness and transparency from the UK and Scottish Government, the nuclear industry and nuclear regulators to ensure that the public are consulted and informed about plans to transport nuclear waste including the risks and the emergency plans in place to deal with accidents or a terrorist attack

He believes in the opinion of the social scientist Margaret Mead who said : “Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”

Tor has been a Member of the Dounreay Stakeholder Group since 2013 and attends quarterly meetings in Thurso attended by representatives of public bodies and other organisations in the area with an interest in the Dounreay site.

Diana Mackenzie – Treasurer

Diana Mackenzie used to drive around in an orange 2CV with a big Nuclear Power No Thanks smiley sticker on the back, and had her fair share of toots, thumbs up and thumbs down and fingers up. Nuclear energy is an issue that divides opinion, but there is a need for clarity and open-ness rather than secrecy, and on the particular issue of the transport of nuclear materials I support the aims of HANT, in bringing this issue to a wider community.

Veronica Egan – Secretary

I have decided to campaign with HANT because I believe that any money going into the nuclear industry should be used to try and find an effective way of dealing with the huge amounts of highly dangerous waste we have already created. This now needs to be stored safely for many generations to come – at great expense. I will never be persuaded that creating more nuclear waste, when we simply don’t need to, is a good idea. Nuclear power is very expensive, and is neither a safe nor a green option. Transporting existing waste dramatically increases the risks of contamination resulting from the inevitable accidents and poses a huge security risk.

Committee Members

Stephen Pennington

Stephen has been a committee member of HANG (the Highland Anti Nuclear Group) in the mid-1980s. He believes that the issue of nuclear waste and our inability to safely dispose of it, is the strongest argument against the development of nuclear energy across the globe. Attempts to move any such material from where it has already been produced adds significantly to the risks.

Maree Todd

I became involved with HANT when I heard about the plan to transport nuclear waste from Dounreay to Sellafield by sea. The route goes along the North coast, round Cape Wrath and down through the Minches. I’m no expert but that seems like a crazy idea to me. These are tricky waters, there’s no tug nearby and lots of the coastal and island communities depend on fishing, aquaculture and tourism.

The more I have learned the more sceptical I have become. I don’t think all the secrecy surrounding this industry is justified by security. I would have more confidence if there was more transparency and consultation.

Needless to say I am not in favour of new nuclear plants. Some of the nuclear waste we have already produced needs to be stored safely for 100,000 years. That’s a length of time that’s hard to imagine and it is going to cost a fortune. Do we have any surviving buildings or even language from 100,000 years ago? People were living in the pre-historic settlement at Skara Brae just 5000 years ago. Our generation should not be creating headaches like this for future generations – particularly when there is an abundance of alternatives.

Sue Tarr

Whatever your views on the nuclear industry it is fair to say that most of us are a bit vague on the details of how it works. I was impressed how HANT works to raise awareness of what is happening within our own area; Dounreay, its changing role and how nuclear material is transferred out of the site. Knowing how this can potentially affect local communities is, I feel, very important. Try coming along to one of our talks – they are very informative!

Donnie Macleod

I have campaigned against nuclear power and weapons for many years for a variety of reasons. Not least because of the horrific legacy that is left behind for countless future generations to have to deal with. Nuclear waste is a scary product that carries enormous risk to both people and the environment. Large quantities have been and are being created by vested interests with little regard to future health.

Society must make sure that those vested interests are held to account and in check. It is good that Scotland will hopefully soon be free from any production of the waste product but I believe it is wrong for us, or indeed any other country, to inflict the burden on others by moving the stuff about.

I agree wholeheartedly with the core principle that the best and only way to deal with nuclear waste is to store it securely where it has been produced until, if ever, a better solution for it’s disposal is found.

It is incredibly foolhardy to think you can transport it without putting both the environment that it crosses and the people living there at risk. The risk may be small but the consequences are so terrible that the risk is completely unacceptable. Any insurance company will tell you that risk is quantifiable by multiplying the probability of an event happening by the amount of damage caused. So how can you quantify an area being unfit for human habitation for thousands of years.
I will do all in my power to stop this stupid and reckless practice of transporting this lethal material across our land, sea, and airspace.